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Calibre Audio Library

Malorie Blackman

This year Black History Month is celebrating the accomplishments of Black Britons in all areas of achievement throughout history, with a focus on...

Find out more about October is Black History Month
Wormhole

This Libraries Week we've been looking at the role of libraries in the digital world and so it's the perfect opportunity to look delve into the...

Find out more about Book To The Future: Top picks for Libraries Week
Edison and phonograph

Continuing the 2019 Libraries Week theme on the role of libraries in the digital world, let us begin with a quick look at a novel about the early...

Find out more about How audiobooks began
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New Books

New Books for October

September

Step into the world of the theatre with Joseph O’Connor’s Shadowplay (13449) a fictionalised telling of the real life friendship between theatre manager and actor Henry Irving, actress Ellen Terry and author Bram Stoker. The year is 1878 and the venue is the Lyceum theatre in London where three very familiar names come together in a tale full of drama, transformation and the painful devotion to art and to one another. The Guardian newspaper calls it a “hugely entertaining book about the grand scope of friendship and love” so this could be one to take a chance on.

Ben MacIntyre has written several books on World War Two with particular emphasis on double agents and secret operations. In The Spy and the Traitor (13457), he moves into the Cold war to tell the true story about a KGB double agent who had for over ten years supplied British intelligence with secrets from the heart of the Soviet regime. Labelled as “The best true spy story I have ever read” by John Le Carré this is a good one to get your teeth into on those autumnal evenings.

Belinda Bauer is a crime writer who, if you have not encountered her before, is an author to add to your must read pile. In The Facts of Life and Death (13520) we meet ten-year-old Ruby who is devoted to her Dad and just wants her Mum to stop arguing with him. On the cliff tops and coastal paths of North Devon where they live, there is a sinister killer on the loose who targets women and forces them to call home to their mothers’ one last time. Belinda Bauer not only weaves a good story but is exceptional at diverting the reader from guessing the culprit too early. She also has a talent for manipulating the setting so that the cliff tops and woods in this story seem almost as threatening as the killer.

Professor Brian Cox, master of all things science, is back to explain to us all about The Planets (13543) in his laidback and engaging manner. Written with Andrew Cohen this book accompanied the BBC television series of the same name and explores the solar system in a way that it hasn’t been seen before. If you enjoy studying the planets or are just curious to find out more then give this book a listen.

Author Toni Morrison was an American novelist, essayist, book editor, and college professor who sadly died in August this year. Arguably her most famous work was Beloved which won her the Pullitzer prize in 1988 and was made into a film ten years later. We have just added Jazz (13539) to the library which is the book she wrote after Beloved. The setting for this book is Harlem in the winter of 1926. Joe Trace has shot dead his lover, the impetuous 18-year-old Dorcas. At the funeral his determined, hardworking wife Violet tries to disfigure the corpse with a knife. Their story captures the complex humanity of black American urban life at that time.

If you like authors such as Dinah Jefferies and Santa Montefiore then it is just possible that you would also enjoy novels by Charlotte Betts. An author of historical romance, she conjures a vibrant sense of place and time for whatever century she is writing in. In The Dressmaker’s Secret (13525) we are taken to Italy in 1819 where Emilia and her mother drift from town to town making a living as dressmakers. When they finally find a town to settle in, the outlook is positive but a vicious attack on her mother and a deathbed confession turns Emilia’s world upside down.

If you were asked to name some of the world’s most famous explorers then Christopher Columbus would no doubt feature on that list. He was an Italian explorer, navigator, and colonist who completed four voyages across the Atlantic Ocean supported by the Catholic Monarchs of Castile and Aragon. His chronicling of these journeys are all brought together in The Four Voyages of Christopher Columbus (13430) which gives a real insight into the events that unfolded including things like crew rebellions and the lives of sailors at that time and the discovery of new islands, tribes, cultures, animals, crops and diseases. A voyage of discovery in the words of the explorer himself.

Writing a diary is a pastime that countless numbers of people have undertaken over the centuries. It is in fact one of the main ways in which we can learn so much about people who have lived before us including the social history of that time, and in these circumstances their existence is invaluable. A diary can also be a useful tool in working through emotions or difficult periods as sometimes it is easier to write things down than speak about them. It is also a place that you can embellish your thoughts as after all the majority of people write a diary believing it won’t be read by anyone else! The diary has a history and the way in which we keep them and indeed how we talk about our most private thoughts has evolved over time, so that there is a question as to whether the practice of keeping a diary has been replaced by social media platforms such as Twitter. If this discourse has attracted your attention, then try The Private Life of the Diary by Sally Bayley (13432) who discusses the topic in more detail.

Author James Henry brought back R D Wingfield’s character DI Jack Frost writing prequels to the series which began with First Frost. He has now introduced us to a Detective Inspector of his own creation in the form of Nick Lowry, who we meet for the first time in the crime novel Blackwater (13469). Set in the 1980’s we are taken to the Blackwater Estuary in Essex where an illicit shipment, will frantically accelerate tensions in the historic town, and leave its own murderous trace. Nick Lowry and his team must now put disagreements aside and work together against this new enemy that threatens to harm the community.

Charles Mingus Juniorwas an American jazz double bassist, pianist, composer and bandleader. He is considered to be one of the greatest jazz musicians and composers in history, with a career spanning three decades and collaborations with other jazz legends such as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington and Charlie Parker. His memoir Beneath the Underdog (13546) describes his interesting and sometimes turbulent journey towards the acclaim of being one of the greats of twentieth century music.

 

 

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